<i>Echinococcus granulosus </i>Sensu Stricto and <i>Echinococcus multilocularis</i> in a Gray Wolf (<i>Canis lupus</i>) in Turkey: Further Evidence for Increased Risk of Alveolar Echinococcosis in Urban Areas


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AKYÜZ M., KİRMAN R., GÜVEN E., BALKAYA İ., AVCIOĞLU H.

ACTA PARASITOLOGICA, vol.69, no.2, pp.1319-1323, 2024 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 69 Issue: 2
  • Publication Date: 2024
  • Doi Number: 10.1007/s11686-024-00842-x
  • Journal Name: ACTA PARASITOLOGICA
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, Animal Behavior Abstracts, Aquatic Science & Fisheries Abstracts (ASFA), BIOSIS, CAB Abstracts, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Veterinary Science Database
  • Page Numbers: pp.1319-1323
  • Keywords: Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto, Echinococcus multilocularis, Gray wolf, Turkey
  • Ataturk University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Objective The aim of this study was to identify Echinococcus species by morphological and molecular means. Methods A dead gray wolf (Canis lupus) was found near Erzurum province and brought to the parasitology laboratory. Sedimentation and counting technique (SCT) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis were conducted. Results The SCT implications indicated that the wolf had a substantial worm burden (62,720 and 49,280 parasites) due to a co-infection of E. granulosus s.l. and E. multilocularis. Genus/species-specific PCR was used to analyze DNA extracted from adult worms and confirmed as E. granulosus s.s. and E. multilocularis, utilizing COI and 12S rRNA gene sequence analysis, respectively. Conclusion This report presents the first co-detection of E. granulosus s.s. and E. multilocularis in a gray wolf found in an urban area in a highly endemic area for human echinococcosis in northeastern Turkey. The results emphasize that AE is not only a problem of rural areas, but also occurs in urban areas, which may pose a threat to public health. Therefore, surveillance in urban areas is crucial. The need to develop new control strategies for domestic and wildlife in the study area is also highlighted.